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Credits: The Council for Medical Schemes Script Newsletter Issue 13 2014 Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in rich and poor countries. In 2012, breast cancer was present in 6.3 million women worldwide. According to the World Health Organization, breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death among women with…

The ministerially appointed National Essential Medicines List (EML) Committee will start with the review of the Standard Treatment Guidelines and EML for Hospital Level (Paediatrics), 2013 edition. Please assist the Committee with the review of the EML by identifying those medicines that should be prioritised for evaluation. Constructive comment with regard to the inclusion/deletion of…

Treatment guidelines and essential medicines list for South Africa. Hospital level adults 2012 edition National Department of Health, Pretoria. To download click here

After months of painstaking work, the result of the South African Civil Society NCDs Benchmarking exercise is out for your comment. While every effort has been taken to ensure that this draft is correct and supported by documentary evidence and other input, we apologise in advance for any errors. We sincerely ask for your input…

How long have you been at the head of SADAG? I started SADAG in 1994, at the encouragement of Prof Michael Berk, who was my psychiatrist. I had had massive Panic attacks for ten years without the right treatment, but when I got the treatment, (medication from the psychiatrist,) I became well within four weeks….

Compiled by Jessica Beagley Please find below this week’s selection of interesting news stories and reports. If you come across any interesting articles or reports, please do share them with me and I will include them in next week’s digest. Global Development News UN News: Funding gap looms amid efforts to tackle ‘twin plagues’ Ebola, ISIL,…

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