Milestone Tobacco Control Bill progress Aug 22

Milestone Tobacco Control Bill progress Aug 22

The Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill, 2018 (Tobacco Control Bill)  has reached the Cabinet which is a milestone in its passage into law. Here is the update on the progress to enact the Tobacco Control Bill

  1. The 1st pre-Cabinet Committee (Technical Working Committee) recommended the Bill to the next committee.
  2. The 2nd pre-Cabinet Committee of the Deputy Director Generals of the 18 national departments in the Social Cluster recommended the Bill progress.
  3. Following the 1 August 2022 NDOH presentation of the Bill to the Forum of the Directors-Generals (FOSAD) approved the Bill to be considered by the Cabinet.

Although much remains to be done in Cabinet and Parliament (National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces) before the Bill is enacted, progress at FOSAD is a milestone. The progress also highlightsthe important roles the various stakeholders play.

WHO NCD Hard talks: technology

WHO NCD Hard talks: technology

NCD Hard Talk_13 July_flyer
We are pleased to invite you to the next NCD Hard Talk webinar taking place on Wednesday, 13 July 2022, 13:00 – 14:30 CEST titled “Going BIG on NCDs: Technology, Clinical Care and the Great Divine.”

Profound and urgent changes are required to respond to the accelerating NCD burden, and a global shake-up is needed to reimagine the possibilities – and invent solutions fit for this new era. The recently established Global Group of Heads of State and Government on NCD provides an opportunity to engage the highest authorities on these BIG NCD solutions.

In this NCD Hard Talk session, we explore three examples of distinct, cutting-edge visions that can radically impact NCD outcomes, including:

  • Medicines: technology transfer for local production of insulin and NCD medicines to increase access
  • Acute care: strengthening immediate care for saving lives
  • Community: leveraging faith-based authority for NCD prevention and control

Join us on Wednesday by registering here: https://who.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aAPSps-cRduO26HOaI4bYA

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Planning Commission to analyse NDP implementation shortcomings

Planning Commission to analyse NDP implementation shortcomings

gungubele 11 April 2022
Minister in the Presidency, Mondli Gungubele, says a key issue commissioners appointed to the National Planning Commission (NPC) will be expected to address is the slow progress in the implementation of the National Development Plan (NDP) and to identify solutions to make sure that the country fast tracks its route to the NDP goals.

The Minister, who serves as chairperson of the NPC, was speaking during a first media briefing of the third NPC which was appointed in December last year. “One of the shortcomings that [the NPC] has identified…was the incapacity of the state to implement the proposals of the NDP. This often combined with poor leadership that pay lip-service to the NDP without understanding its goals has acted as an obstacle to implementation of developmental objectives.

“As government, we are clear that the greatest challenge has been around implementation and in the discussions held to date, this was my emphasis to guide the discussions,” Gungubele said.

The National Development Plan – which was adopted ten years ago – was created as an action plan for government to tackle several challenges facing the country including unemployment, poverty, inequality, safety and healthcare. “The NDP was designed to change the lives of all South Africans by taking a comprehensive approach where the reality of 2012 [would] become a different one by 2030. We must recognise that we have not met the goals as we intended 10 years ago, that is true.

“Recognising this is the first step to asking: how do we do things differently to change the trajectory that we are on. This is where [the commission] will assist us as we tackle this challenge where implementation of our plans has not met the targets,” he said.

NPC Deputy Chairperson, Professor Tinyiko Maluleke, said the third NPC begins its term at a precarious moment in our country’s history and the “tall order” it faces in bringing the country closer to what the NDP envisioned. “There is, of course, a reason why we are called the NPC…and not the National Implementation Commission. But if implementation is slow or non-existent, planning alone, is clearly insufficient. Given that ours is a tenure that is closest to the finish line of 2030, we cannot afford to be dismissive, smug or philosophical about implementation.

“We have to probe why it is, why it has been so hard to coordinate, to cohere, to cascade down, to streamline and pinpoint down the necessary catalytic interventions which will embed and institutionalise the NDP within the departmental, provincial and municipal plans,” he said.

Professor Maluleke said the NPC will also give attention to identifying catalytic areas for government to pursue. “Countries which have successfully achieved their national developmental goals and targets are those at the heart of whose plans are clear catalytic priorities around which the whole state machinery is mobilized.

“The third NPC will help to enhance the ability of the state to identify and pursue catalytic priorities which will expedite the attainment of NDP goals,” he said.  According to Maluleke, another focus area for the NPC will be mobilizing the country’s support for the NDP and its goals.

“Although the NDP is a plan for the whole country, it has not been sufficiently adopted by all sectors at all times. As we mark its tenth anniversary in September, the NPC is urging all South Africans to rally behind the NDP to ensure its implementation and to call government to account on the basis of the promise contained in the NDP. “To that end, the NPC is committed to building partnerships broadly across society and to pursing engagements that should ensure active citizenry and strong leadership for development,” he said. 

2023 NDoH Annual Performance Plan presentation

2023 NDoH Annual Performance Plan presentation

Today is the health budget speech at 14:00, and in the interests of transparency and inclusivity, it would be great if we, the people, had a look at it beforehand. The budget speech is a version of the Annual Performance Plan (APP) for the financial year to 31 March 2023.

So we are already into the financial year, and the APP23 s already in progress. Having asked for said APP23 PDF, and scouring government and parliamentary websites, we are still in the dark. The closest we came to is a presentation from the health portfolio committee.


The most positive aspect for NCDs+ is that NCDs+ are still in stream, branch or programme 3 along with communicable diseases. At least it hasn’t be shoved back in Programme 4 Primary Health Care where it languished without food or water.

Mind you it is unlikely to change much since the Medium Term Strategic Framework 2019-2024 (MTSEF24) does not prioritise NCDs+ or allocate funding. Except in the most peripheral way. I call this the legacy of 3M era: MDGs, Motsoaledi and Mkhize. Too bad that we are in SDG times and need different action to achieve universal health coverage (UHC target 3.8) and there is more than the target 3.4to achieve action on NCDs.

The MTSF 2019-2024 – a lasting legacy courtesy of the 3M era, MDGs, Motsoaledi and Mkhize.
The absence of national budgets for NCDs+ is not the only issue. At the last count maybe one province had a sort-of-NCDs plan. Clear budget line items are awaited as an evolutionary step like the missing link. It would would great to have progress at the implementation level and within National Health Insurance budgets.

Joy there is a change to the number of outcomes and outputs covering NCDs+ in the APP23. That means a lot without a programme budget and an implementation plan.